April 2017
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
« Mar   May »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Day April 6, 2017

Sponsor: MailButler Business Opens New Horizons For Your Team

MailButler Business is the new version of the popular productivity mail plugin. It includes a variety of features, which ensure complete control over the email flow for teams.

There is comprehensive tracking, integration with CRM tools, team management, and much more. Using a convenient dashboard, team managers can assign roles and tasks to team members, watch their activity and usage statistics, as well as share custom signatures or message templates.

MailButler provides its Business plan users with the sender’s detailed information they need, such as social media profiles, affiliations, etc. It can also automatically forward messages for further processing to your preferred CRM tool, such as Salesforce, Pipedrive or others.

MailButler Business can be customized to each team’s individual needs. It opens up completely new horizons, and is totally worth a try! For more information, see the MailButler Business page.

Blog_Business_1600x690

Contact Less

In September 2016 Apple Pay came to support the world’s largest public transit system. It happened through the integration with Japan’s FeliCa and gave Apple Pay access to 160 million daily transactions.

This, along with many other milestones don’t get a lot of attention. Apple Pay is in what could be considered an attritional competition with non-consumption. There are no decisive battles won or lost, only the relentless pressure to make progress against a reluctance to change.

Before I go on, I should make the attrition/decisive type of conflict clear. The terms come from military science. A war of attrition is one where two sides essentially grind against each other and the winner is the one which lasts longest. A decisive battle is one where a conflict is won through a single, acute encounter where, due to either demoralizing or circumstance reasons, one side gives up. It’s the knock-out punch vs. the fight to exhaustion.

When applying this dichotomy to competition, we need to be careful about who we define as competitors. Note that I said that Apple Pay is in a fight with non-consumption. It’s tempting to say Apple Pay competes with some other payment system like Samsung Pay or Google Pay. But none of these alternatives are as powerful as the existing mix of contact payment systems: cash, credit card magnetic swiping and some other hybrid of codes and user experiences (especially online.)

When seen this way the challenger must compete through persistence. It’s impossible for Apple Pay to decisively defeat non-consumption in one battle. It takes literally millions of decisions for adoption: each consumer, each merchant, each bank, each point of sale. It’s a relentless grind of pitching, selling, demonstrating and shaming into action.

It’s been three years of this type of competition and progress may seem hard to spot. That is because we don’t see the big wins. We can only see small wins. The win in Japan, as significant as it might be (160 million daily transactions added to the addressable market) is still small compared to all transactions world-wide.