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Podcast: The New Industry Analysts, Who Are They? (Part One)

Over the last couple of years we have been witness to the rise (and fall) of new research initiatives. What defines them, and what drives them to take on the market as they do?

Hosts Thom and Derk Erbé are joined by Phil Fersht, Michael Coté, William Tincup and Horace Dediu. The panel drills down on new types of industry analysts and how they will change the IT research landscape.

Source: Podcast: The New Industry Analysts, Who Are They? (Part One)

The Critical Path #155: The New Production Method

Horace and Anders discuss car production methods, the BMW i3, tubular and composite frame construction and how Uber could change the landscape.

Source: The Critical Path #155

The Critical Path #154: Come Fly With Me

Horace and Anders talk about the “Plug Bug”, safety in the aircraft industry and take listener questions.

Source: The Critical Path #154

The Eric Jackson Podcast Ep. 6 – Horace Dediu on If/When The iPhone Will Be Disrupted 

Eric speaks with blogger and Apple/disruption analyst Horace Dediu about when the iPhone will be disrupted, why a purely ad-based business model is problematic, and how he became one of the top tech bloggers

The Critical Path #152

Horace talks about Jony Ive’s promotion and answers listener questions on everything from Apple TV to the need for companies to “have children”.

Source: The Critical Path #152

The Critical Path #151

Horace and Anders discuss Comcast, cable companies and lowest common denominator content on television screens everywhere. After the break, Horace takes listener questions from Twitter.

Source: The Critical Path #151

The Asymco Trilogy with Horace Dediu Part 3 – The Asian Cars Edition – Analyse Asia with Bernard Leong

In the last and final part of the trilogy, Horace discussed the Japanese automotive industry, and provided interesting insights into how Japanese car culture contrasts against the European and US counterparts. Using the innovator’s stopwatch framework, Horace explained the challenges on how Tesla, Google, Uber and Amazon could disrupt the car industry, and provide some thoughts on what approach Apple might take on creating the car if they are doing it

Source: Episode 33: The Asymco Trilogy with Horace Dediu Part 3 – The Asian Cars Edition – Analyse Asia with Bernard Leong

The Critical Path #150: Circling Back

Horace interviews Anders about Goldman Sachs’ investment in Internet finance company Circle and we take listener questions over Twitter.

Source: 5by5 | The Critical Path #150: Circling Back

The Asymco Trilogy with Horace Dediu Part 2 – Apple in Asia & Luxury – Analyse Asia with Bernard Leong

Horace Dediu, current fellow of the Clayton Christensen Institute and founder of Asymco.com joined us for an epic and insightful discussion focusing on few key interesting topics: (a) new market disruption theories, (b) Apple in China and the luxury market and (c) the Japanese automotive industry and how it shapes up against disruption from Tesla, Uber and Apple. In the second part of the trilogy, Horace discussed how Apple has managed to navigate the Asian markets with a combination of building the best product and building strategic partnerships with patience and grow the market with the right timing of the correct localised product, for example, the iPhone 6 Plus. Horace also pushed against the notion that Apple is really entering the luxury market, by applying “Jobs to be Done” perspective (used by Bob Moesta in his interviews) to the issue.

Source: Episode 32: The Asymco Trilogy with Horace Dediu Part 2 – Apple in Asia & Luxury – Analyse Asia with Bernard Leong

The Instrument Makers | The Christensen Institute

When we think about how great theories are built, one pattern seems to pop up repeatedly: breakthroughs are preceded by the insight into one (n=1) insight. The key observation of an anomaly that disabused us of a false assumption leads us to a far deeper causal understanding.

I’ll illustrate with a simple history of astronomy. For millennia, the theory of astronomy was informed by data provided by our eyes. The human eye could observe celestial objects with great acuity, and with great patience and record keeping the recognition of patterns in movements allowed the building of a vast database of predictions about the universe. We see this in many societies around the world: from Nordic seafaring navigators to Mayan calendars to Greek scholars. They all built predictive models and associated mythologies around the observable night sky.

These models included a construct called the calendar, the horoscope, navigation charts and even rare event predictors such as eclipses. Computing devices were even built to allow the calculation of these events by laypersons rather than a priestly class.

Our eyes remained the observational instruments underpinning all these theories. The world (and otherworld) view was informed and repeatably tested through eyesight. It wasn’t until the technology of lenses was developed (initially for a completely different purpose) that new instruments could be used to augment the eye.

These telescopes (and their brethren, the microscopes) changed many theories profoundly. The information that optical telescopes could convey allowed the observation of anomalies (e.g. planets) which changed the earth-centric view of the universe which, in turn, challenged much of the balance of power in society.

Read more and comment: The Instrument Makers | Christensen Institute