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Espoo, we have a problem.

Poor quality of Nokia software is source of astonishment for market analysts.

Helsingin Sanomat – International Edition – Business & Finance — Analysts: Nokia has wasted 3 years trying to come up with challenger to iPhone.

A queue is forming to get on board the clue train but, instead of getting in line, Finland seems to be sitting and watching incredulously how the line grows.

The Finnish newspaper article continues:

The media often takes a blindly uncritical view of all Apple’s doings, such that the positive attention paid to the company’s products is in no way proportionate to the weight of the products themselves.

A good example is Apple’s iPad tablet, the commercial success of which is still a large question-mark. This has nevertheless not prevented journalists over the Atlantic from writing profusely and ecstatically about the newcomer.

If Nokia keep believing this their competitiveness problem will surely not go away.
Additional thoughts on the likely response process from Nokia here.
  • Mike in Helsinki

    It's abundantly clear that at least one of Helsingin Sanomat's (Helsinki's Newspaper) journalists doesn't even read his company's own newspaper.

    In their April 30th English language online version, an unsigned article entitled "Analysts: Nokia has wasted 3 years trying to come up with challenger to iPhone" makes the arrogant assertion that "The media often takes a blindly uncritical view of all Apple’s doings, such that the positive attention paid to the company’s products is in no way proportionate to the weight of the products themselves."

    The article continues, "A good example is Apple’s iPad tablet, the commercial success of which is still a large question-mark. This has nevertheless not prevented journalists over the Atlantic from writing profusely and ecstatically about the newcomer."

    When I read that, I laughed out loud. How pompous.

    Really? Are journalists 'over the Atlantic' so uniformly hypnotized by Steve Job's 'reality distortion field' that they too fall in line like so many lemmings headed off a cliff?

    Someone should point out to the wayward reporter who penned such nonsense that one of their own staff colleagues, Pekka Mykkänen, wrote for the very same newspaper on April 19th from Washington an article entitled "Applen iPad lumosi perheeni" (Apple's iPad enchanted my family).

    In his article, Mr. Myykkänen went to great lengths to ensure his readership that "Apple ei tarjonnut minulle rahaa, kahvia, henkistä tukea tai lehdistömateriaalia tätä pääsääntöisesti myönteistä kirjoitusta varten" (Apple did not offer to me money, coffee, personal assistance or press materials for this generally positive writing).

    You should read the piece. I have hardly read such forthright, analytical and complimentary praise of an Apple product – ever. And all coming from, yes, another Helsingin Sanomat journalist.

    The bottom line is that Apple has been outperforming mighty Nokia in mobile phone innovation, software and especially financial metrics. Could it be that some journalists, even in the Daughter of the Baltic, just might be having a hard time accepting that?

    First it was iPod. Then iPod touch. Then iPhone. Now iPad. Could iAd be next?

    As Steve Jobs said," … from everything I've heard, Babe Ruth only had one home run. He just kept hitting it over and over again."

  • http://asymco.wordpress.com asymco

    The claim of absence of criticism of the iPad by journalists does not stand up given the overwhelming negative press the device received on its initial presentation. The iPad Death Watch (http://aaplinvestors.net/stats/ipad/ipaddeathwatch/) is a list of the juiciest condemnations and declarations of imminent iPad demise.

    But that's beside the point. The product attracts knee-jerk defensiveness precisely because it's so disruptive. In a curious way, the more the product is dismissed, the more likely it is that it will upend the incumbent computing paradigm.

  • M

    I think it is hard for a phone manufacturer to realize that phones have been replaced by another technology. To ask it to no longer make phones, but something else is a big jump.

    At the time cell-phones were replacing landlines, so it was a new technology, which wave Nokia rode well.

    But the same thing happened to the telegraph and soon, the television.