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Sponsor: Counterpoint

Do you or your team need a detailed understanding of smartphone sales or installed base?

For example:

  • How many Galaxy Note 4s were sold last month versus iPhone 6 Plus?
  • What is the typical spec of a $150 Android smartphone?

Or any of a million other questions. If so Counterpoint can help. We gather model-level device sales for more than 3000 handset models from over 300 brands across 37 countries every month. We can customise our data to fit your operational needs.

We have a superb resource for: application developers; industrial designers; component vendors; the financial services industry or anyone else who needs to understand connected device market dynamics. Call us for more information.

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Gain insights into what is driving the smartphone market through our analysis of the top 3000 smartphone models across 2014.

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This post is sponsored via Syndicate

 

Sponsor: The Craftsman PM Workshop

You’ve got the resources to ship great products – so what’s holding your team back? Learn to make thoughtfully executed products beyond the MVP. The Craftsman PM Workshop gives you career-boosting insights into the breakthrough practice of Whole Product Management.

In just 2 days at the Craftsman PM workshop, you’ll learn:

  • Exactly how to develop an actionable growth strategy beyond the MVP
  • A holistic way to thinking through the Whole Product model
  • Ways to solve complex product problems in half the time, at half the cost
  • Actionable metrics to improve customer engagement and retention

This workshop is designed for:

  • Product Managers, Marketers and Designers
  • Startup Founder/CEOs formalizing company product management
  • People transitioning into or seeking a Product Management career

“This training provided more takeaway value than any workshop or conference I’ve ever attended.”             – Product Manager, NetSpend

Get early bird pricing!

 

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This post is sponsored via Syndicate.

Sponsor: Mandrill

Integrate, deliver, track, and analyze with Mandrill, an email infrastructure service from MailChimp.

Mandrill is a scalable, reliable, and secure email infrastructure service that’s already trusted by more than 375,000 customers. It’s easy to set up and integrate with existing apps. And it’s really fast, too. With servers all over the world, Mandrill can deliver your email in milliseconds. Use Mandrill to send automated one-to-one email like password resets and welcome messages, as well as marketing emails and customized newsletters. Mandrill is quick to set up, easy to use, and ridiculously stable. We made it for developers, who love documentation, integrations, high delivery rates, webhooks, and analytics. If you’re not comfortable with code and APIs, we recommend finding someone who is before getting started.

Get started with Mandrill today.

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This post is sponsored via Syndicate.

Biggest news of 2014

As corporate romances go, IBM and Apple’s must rank among the most unexpected. As I wrote on the date they changed their Facebook status, the two companies were antagonists for the better part of twenty years and their rapprochement was met with a shrug mostly because yet more decades passed since.

Screen Shot 2014-12-26 at 11.28.03 AM

Nostalgia aside, this new union is profoundly important. It indicates and evidences change on a vast scale. The companies’ antagonism was due to being once aimed at the same business: computing. Since the early 1980s, “computing” came to be modularized into hundreds, perhaps thousands of business models. It is no longer as simple as selling beige boxes. IBM was forced out of building computers and into services and consulting while Apple moved to make devices and the software and services which make its hardware valuable.

The convergence of interests which was consummated into a deal this year stems from the migration of computing around what has come to be called “mobile”. Apple intends to accelerate the adoption of its mobile platforms among the remaining non-adopters: enterprises–a group which, by now, qualifies as laggards.[1] Simultaneously IBM intends to connect data warehouses at those same enterprises to their employed users.

Notes:
  1. There was a time–when Apple was young–when enterprises were the innovators, early adopters. That role ended approximately in the year 2000 []

The Critical Path #134: Chief Jobs Officer

Turning our focus back to “Jobs to be Done” theory, we look at how producers can exceed the expectations of consumers and the role of the focus group from a “Jobs to be Done” perspective.

We examine “Jobs to be Done” as an essential core of the product development process. Where does this kind of thinking belong in an organization?

Should we be redefining what being “the best” means? We close with a segmentation of social media services based on the seven deadly sins.

via 5by5 | The Critical Path #134: Chief Jobs Officer.

This is a good one.

Airshow 12 coming to Boston December 18th

Airshow, now in it’s twelfth iteration, is coming back to Boston on the 18th.

This time we have Fidelity Investments as a sponsor and their inspiring venue at ThinkSpace, 245 Summer Street, as our setting.

If you are interested in how data and mobility will revolutionize the art of persuasion, please register for what will be the best Airshow ever.

Seating is limited.

Sponsor: Harvest Forecast

Managing teams is hard. Imagine it’s Monday morning and your team doesn’t know what they’re working on for the week. Plans change and schedules change with them. Spreadsheets weren’t built for this.

Harvest Forecast is a tool designed to plan your team’s time. Visualize schedules in Forecast and easily adjust them as needed. Forecast keeps your team’s expectations on the same page and helps you move projects forward.

As new projects come in, you’ll know who’s available, and when to hire. Leave behind bloated spreadsheets and begin scheduling in Harvest Forecast with a free 30-day trial.

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The Critical Path #129: The Right Incentives

We talk about Samsung, Apple Pay (vs. CurrentC) and Xiaomi.

via 5by5 | The Critical Path #129: The Right Incentives.

The Critical Path #127: Cupertino to San Francisco on 280

On the October 2014 iPad and iMac event. When are the iPad killer apps going to come out?

 

via 5by5 | The Critical Path #127: Cupertino to San Francisco on 280.

What next, Samsung?

I received a few questions from Shirley Siluk of NewsFactor as a follow-up to my post on the trajectory of successful companies.

1. Do you foresee any hope for a turnaround for Samsung? If so, where do its best opportunities lie?

Screen Shot 2014-10-13 at 1.44.54 PM

The smartphone business was a huge opportunity for Samsung and they took full advantage of it. Unfortunately, it’s a difficult business to stay on top of. The list of victims in that industry is quite long and there have been no long-term winners. Samsung’s operating model seems to be to invest as a ‘fast follower’ filling in the market after it’s established while leveraging capital intensive components synergies. That has also worked for them in consumer electronics (at the expense of Sony and other Japanese vendors). If the modus operandi does not change then their turnaround will depend on the creation of new opportunities/categories. Wearables may be such an opportunity but it may not be as big as the phone business.[1]

2. What has contributed most to Samsung’s decline? Which competitors are posing the greatest threat?

Notes:
  1. The graph shows estimates of smartphone shipments for a select number of vendors. []